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Page 1:
Bionic Commando (Arcade)
Bionic Commando (NES)

Page 2:
Bionic Commando (Game Boy)
Bionic Commando: Elite Forces

Page 3:
Bionic Commando Rearmed

Page 4:
Bionic Commando (2009)

Page 5:
Bionic Commando Rearmed 2

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Bionic Commando - Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Windows (2009)

American Xbox 360 Cover

Japanese Xbox 360 Cover

One year after the spectacular remake of the original Bionic Commando as Bionic Commando Rearmed, the long-anticipated build-up to an actual all-new game in the BC series finally comes to fruition. Bionic Commando Rearmed was awesome enough to stand on its own and not merely feel like a gigantic plug for the upcoming game, but it's obvious that the game's plot was designated to set the backstory for what was due to come. Grin has done a fine job of bringing a new dimension to the adventures of "Radd" Spencer. It's easy to see where some gamers might dislike certain elements, and the game surely has faults, but the sum of the whole adds up to an overall enjoyable experience.

First off, the setting is likely to turn off devoted fans right away due to the "darker and edgier" tone given to the plot and the protagonist. Soon after the destruction of the Albatross, the brutal assassination of Master-D, and the dissolution of the Imperials, Nathan "Radd" Spencer and Joseph "Super Joe" Gibson were hailed as heroes, and bionics became high in demand for military use. The Tactical Arms and Security Committee (TASC), the Federal States of America's (FSA) military intelligence organization, promoted Gibson to its director and Spencer as its chief trainer for new recruits. Bionics flourished and prospered for five years until Operation: Blackout took place. Spencer was assigned alongside fellow commando Jayne "Mag" Magdalene to seek and destroy two fugitive bionic soldiers. Spencer refused to kill the runaway bionics, seeing them as humans and not the dogs of the Federation that his superiors believed them to be. Spencer was summarily jailed for violating his order and sentenced to death, stripped of his bionic arm as he gets thrown into the clink. The specifics of this mission are actually detailed in a comic that can be found on the Bionic Commando webpage.

It was around this time that public opinion of bionic appendages was thrown into turmoil, and the majority of the populace decided that bionics had too much power. Gibson fought to defend the bionic program, but he could not uphold that in which he placed so much faith. Out of fear and prejudice, the "Great Bionic Purge" began shortly after Spencer's imprisonment. Pro-bionic extremists, former TASC bionic soldiers, and even remnants of the defunct Imperials founded the terrorist group "BioReign" and declared war against the FSA. Spearheading the BioReign armada is a mysterious masked man known only as "Silver" and his second-in-command, none other than Gottfired Groeder, Spencer's rival from Bionic Commando Rearmed who survived the collapse of the Albatross. Five years after Spencer's condemnation and ten years after the Imperials incident, BioReign detonates a weapon of mass destruction in Ascension City, one of the biggest metropolises in the FSA. BioReign's motives are uncertain, but it is clear that they are a severe jeopardy to the peace of the nation. To combat this terrible threat, Gibson bails Spencer out of prison and asks his old comrade to kick their asses. Time hasn't been good to our protagonist. Besides losing his pride and bionic arm, his wife Emily disappeared many years ago and it still weighs on his mind. But with nothing to lose, he might as well get to it and be all that a cybernetic grizzled ex-soldier can be. Spencer is released and set out into the collapsed ruins of Ascension City, and he is pissed the hell off. Go go bionic!

There's an incredible amount of backstory for what amounts to what appears to be a standard action plot. It's undeniably darker and edgier than the straightforward story of the original NES game and Rearmed, and that alone is likely to turn off several devoted fans. However, it seems like it wasn't meant to be taken too seriously. It's there to support the game, not carry it all the way throughout. That being said, in a day and age where an impressive presentation begs a plausible plot, Bionic Commando... should definitely not be about the plot.

The graphic style is sure to test the loyalty of longtime fans, primarily due to the RADDical redesign of Spencer. Ten years have changed the freedom fighter from a vaguely Duke Nukem-esque patriot to a gruff dreadlocked ex-convict who's more than a little angsty. There have been numerous complaints about his revision, he doesn't look anything like his Bionic Commando Rearmed incarnation, but alongside the rest of the scenery, he fits well enough. If you absolutely cannot get over his modern appearance, there's a secret code you can get from Bionic Commando Rearmed that gives him his classic character model. Super Joe's appearance isn't quite as drastically altered, though his hard-boiled "detective" look is still quite different from his soldier days. The appearances of the characters fit in well with the rest of the game, though the cast of important people is relatively small.

The scenery of the game is fantastic; while maybe not the classiest visuals in the modern generation, this can be expected from a cityscape in total ruins. Ascension City looks the part of a New York-style skyscraper graveyard with crumbled buildings, scorched earth, broken highways, and corporate billboards to boot! Some critics have a bitter distaste for the shameless advertising for various companies that the game unsubtly exhibits throughout the scenery. Yes, you see all sorts of ads for Pepsi, Nvidia, and other logos for various wares. Maybe it's a bit annoying and cheapens the game's validity, but advertising in games is nothing new. It's perhaps a bit more blatant here than standard, but it's not like you're ever fighting a swarm of floating red-and-blue spheres.

The background music is just about what you would expect for a game of this scale; a fine mix of orchestral and electronic sounds that comes off as dramatic and adds a lot to the overall atmosphere. During sequences of inaction where you survey the terrain or take a break, you can hear the chords swelling up above the silence. But when it comes time to kick ass, the volume inflates and the tempo flares up to match the action. If you have been privy to Simon Viklund's glorious redux of the classic soundtrack in Bionic Commando Rearmed, imagine that, although with a bit of a softer touch, a slower pace, and less throbbing percussion. It's a bit tough to describe sounds with words, as usual, but the music works very well overall. If you keep your ear out for the fine details, you will hear several remixes of old BC music that are done beautifully. Some are obvious; the first stage BC music is redone quite a bit throughout the game, but others are more subtle, such as a dark piece with chords that sound vaguely like the final mission music from the original game.

The voice work also deserves some recognition, even if what's being said is ultimately gravy (more on that later). Mike Patton, the eclectic vocalist of Faith No More, Mr. Bungle, and Fantomas (and several other music projects) provides the incredibly angry voice of Spencer. He deliberately makes Spencer into a cocky, sarcastic, rage-filled son of a bitch who goes over the top with yelling at the enemies he asskicks. Veteran voice actor Steve Blum is Super Joe; even if he pretty much uses the same voice for 98% of all his characters, it's a voice I've come to like a lot and it fits the gruff middle-aged Joe. The most insane voice among the main cast is that of Gottfried Groeder (Scott MacDonald), who hams up his role to high hell every time he pipes up with his wacky "totally not an ex-Nazi" tone. All other voices fit their role well, not a necessity for a good game but a tasty topping for the whole cake.

The aesthetics hold up well enough, but to declare an old saying which has probably been brought up way too many times in relation to this game, "it don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing." The game sure as hell has a lot of swinging to it! The bread-and-butter of the mechanics center on the bionic arm, which you don't actually have at the very start of the game. Thankfully, you only have to go through a very short portion that doesn't even last five minutes without your trusty "sidearm." You have to get by with shooting with your puny pistol until then, but quitting the game before you even get a minute in is bad form. Once you get the arm, you enter a tutorial in the form of a flashback that goes over most of the fine points of using the arm, starting with basic maneuvers and getting into offensive actions near the end. After being tossed back into present reality, it's time to take a leap of faith down into the city and start the mission.

The control is one of the game's strong points, as it makes full use of the gamepad and explains what each button does while the next area is loading. A model of the controller pops up on the screen, and pressing a button tells you of its intended use. The controls are easy to learn, but it's a nice feature that can serve as a refresher. The basics allow you to jump, punch up-close enemies, and look at nearby events. All control of the arm is handled by the L-trigger/L2, where the simplest application is to point your aiming cursor at the nearest surface and hold on the button to fire your arm. You can swing by moving back and forth as long as you have suitable space to move, or you can hoist yourself up with a leap to higher ground. While swinging forward, two blue lines appear to indicate the optimal time to swing for maximum distance. You simply let go of the swing button and either land or hold the swing button again in midair to latch onto your next target. No precise button press is required to attach to the next object. Swinging from point alpha to point beta is relatively easy to accomplish, not to mention damn fun. Considering you have to do so much of it, swinging will come naturally with playing for any substantial period of time.

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

If you do screw up a swing, you will not be penalized if you find solid ground beneath you. Falls cannot kill you in this game thanks to Spencer's Iron Boots, which absorb shocks from any plunge, no matter how drastic. There are a scant few voids that will engulf you, but these are uncommon and are fleeting concerns compared to the blue clouds of radiation that float around everywhere. When the biohazard sign pops up on the screen, your prerogative is to turn tail and flee before the screen becomes crimson. You don't die immediately if you swing into a blue cloud, but sometimes, death can't be helped if you swing too far into bad air. Bodies of water can also kill you in this game, as is the standard for many action games, but the game actually gives a legitimate explanation; Spencer's arm is too heavy for the rest of his body to stay buoyant in water. You'll have to swing to stay above the sea, but if you fall in, you do not die instantly; a purple air meter pops up and allows you a few seconds to find a solid surface and pull yourself out.

To some, the concept of the radiation clouds are a means of restricting free roam around each level, killing the curious spirit of the avid adventurer. The game was deliberately intended to be linear, and radiation was what they decided to place in the game instead of instant death spikes. People bitched about this "lack of freedom" when it came to Killer7 as well, even though that one was even more stratified and had many areas and passages that you could not travel due to its "on-rails" gameplay. To be frank, if a game has too much of it or it's done poorly, exploration can be a frustrating exercise that kills the pace of the game and initiates mind-numbing boredom and confusion. In BC, you almost always know where to go and what to do, and anyone thinking that the game was meant to be less linear than it is missed the point. Still, one can't help but think there could've been a more natural solution fixed through level design.

Aside from natural hazards, you will also have to deal with BioReign troops everywhere you swing. Most of them come in your basic yellow flavor (grunts) with some red-suited ones among them (leaders). The leaders are slightly tougher than grunts, but both function the same way: They blast at you with their pistols or rifles from afar, and when you come in close, they whip out electrified batons which do massive damage if they strike you. Other troops include snipers and heavy-armed soldiers, and while not too bad singularly, BioReign fighters can easily kill you in groups. There's no health bar to indicate your amount of punishment, only an increasing red tint complete with a danger beep if you get close to death. Retreating to a safe place will regenerate your health, so always have an escape plan if things get hairy, which is bound to happen against Biomechs and Polycraft. Biomechs are hulking robotic suits usually armed with shotguns and incredible strength and agility, not to mention energy shields. They have to be hit with heavy force in their glowing back to do significant damage. Polycraft are flying machines that obnoxiously hover just out of your arm's reach while pelting you with machine guns and missiles. You've got to hit their underbelly or blast them with explosive force. The game often forces you to fight Biomechs or Polycraft in pairs, a challenge for certain!

BioReign is heavily armed, but your arm is the heaviest of all. The best part about the game is all of the different methods of havoc you're granted to impose upon the opposing forces via your appendage. You don't have all of your abilities right away, but you recall them at key points in the game, and each new one is more useful than the last. To start, you can attach the arm to an enemy and perform a "zip kick" where you catapult yourself towards the target feet first. Then there's the "death from above," where Spencer's iron boots protect him well as he shifts all weight to his legs and smashes the ground with a powerful shockwave. Spencer eventually recalls the "rip," where you pull off walls and drag down heavy objects, sometimes onto a group of enemies. You can "punch up" either heavy objects or enemies with a metal uppercut and spike them down into groups of baddies like a volleyball of doom. The coolest ability is to "throw" objects arm-first, acting somewhat like the "punch up" but at longer distances. Finally, you gain an "adrenaline meter" that allows you to pull off a devastating wire spin attack to blow off soldiers around you, enhance your "death from above," or instantly obliterate Biomechs or Polycraft.

It's feasible to get through several parts of the game with just the arm, but other situations require the firepower that Spencer's normal arm is able to carry. Granted, guns aren't nearly as interesting as mechanical appendages, but they're good to have around. All weapons in this game, even the weakest one, require ammunition to function, but running low on ammo is rarely a problem. Spencer's default weapon is the "Tungsten," a pistol that's weak, fires fast, and can take out humans instantly with a headshot. This is what you'll be using in mid-range in combat when you're not maiming with your metal mauler. Then there are the obligatory grenades, which have spikes for no good reason other than to look cooler. You know how this works: Aim, toss, go boom. Ammo for the Tungsten can be found in common yellow-banded canisters, usually around enemy groups. More grenades can be found in blue canisters, and rare additional ammunition for your "special weapon" is coded red.

These special weapons include the "Hiker," a gigantic shotgun that obliterates anything up close, the "Yelena," a sniper rifle which generally isn't too useful but helpful for those pesky snipers, the "Bulldog," a grenade launcher which is good for any range except for point blank, the "Tarantula," a homing rocket launcher which is very helpful for mechanical enemies, and even good ol' Super Joe's Machine Gun, more powerful than it's ever been before. While it's always nice to pack some extra firepower, these weapons are seldom mandatory to destroy the enemies, save for the occasional big battle that warrants some more oomph. Weapons are provided to you by drop pods with rocket in and crash on set points, and they're not usually given to you unless you activate a "relay" mechanism. These relays are like the communication rooms of old in that you hack into them to gain information and advance. Most text speaks about current happenings and the "Bionic Purge" in the game's backstory; nothing is quite as amusing as conversations in past BC games, though one particularly amusing text involves two soldiers goofing off. Relays are necessary to disable the electrical currents of aerial minefields which would otherwise bar your progress. However, these explosives become mere swing fodder after robbing them of their energy and are conveniently arranged to allow passage to the next area.

To be honest, the gun combat is not all that impressive. For example, zip-kicking a Biomech in the back weakens it enough for you to mash the fire button and cause a good chunk of damage with just the pistol, but if you don't use the arm, it's damn tough to kill. In other instances, the game encourages that you use the arm attacks to kill enemies, because you can't carry much ammo, and while it's easily restocked, it's all too easy to empty a single clip fighting just a few enemies. This game is all about the swinging, and that's very clear.

Speaking of the swinging, the game gets a bit redundant with its premise. It moves fast, and catapulting through the air like a cyber-monkey is often exhilarating and fun, but over extended periods of play, it does get somewhat old. The nature of the game elicits some expected repetition, but there could be more spice in your routine besides learning new moves at certain points. By the end of the first act, you've fought pretty much every basic enemy type there aside from some variations later on. It doesn't help that the same scenery tends to get repeated over and over - destroyed city, underground cavern, an industrial area, another underground cavern, etcetera.

That's the bulk of the gameplay as it is, where the majority of it consists of following waypoints, finding relays, and kicking everyone's ass when forcefields are present. It's simple and fun, but for those who grow weary of the single-player campaign, there is also a multiplayer mode good for killing some time on the side. Bionic Commando was certainly not tailored around the multiplayer aspect, but it serves its purpose and makes for some decent third-person shooter action against your buds... or, more often than not, random newbies and teabaggers. There are three modes, allowing up to eight players at a time, all by-the-book multiplayer stuff; Deathmatch (kill as many others as you can within the time limit) Team Deathmatch (work with a team to kill the opposing team) or Capture the Flag (obtain the enemy flag and whisk it back to your base before the enemy kills you while defending your own flag). It's disappointing that there's no King of the Hill mode, but Bionic Commando is not a multiplayer shooter; the multiplayer here is an afterthought alongside the main game, and it is good as that.

Amongst some of the other issues, the biggest gripe is the lack of boss fights; the few that are there are done very well, but there are only three legitimate bosses overall, not including the final confrontation. What's there is fantastic - the first is a battle against a giant helicoper amidst a halfway constructed building. Stay still and it'll pepper you with bullets, but you need lock on with your missiles to destroy it. There's some spectacular gymnastics you can pull off here - dangle off a girder, quickly lock on, fire away, let go, and whirl around to grab onto another platform before you fall into a bit. The second battle is against a robotic worm called the Mohole, wherein you need to lob cars and other bits to debris right at its mouth.

There's also the issue of "collectibles" in the game, items shaped like sprites from the NES Bionic Commando, and exist only to unlock pieces for the requisite art gallery, not to mention an achievement and bragging rights. There is a certain aspect about the collecting that poses a problem for anyone endeavoring to catch them all (of which there are 150 in total, ironically enough). Some of their locations are not obvious, nothing which a peer at a guide cannot fix, but what if you miss one and you accidentally travel into the next area before you have a chance to claim it? Your option is to realize that you are screwed, and if you are so inclined, restart the game from the very beginning. This is really a minor aspect that will only piss off the most devoted of gamers who need that 100% mark, but this sort of "punishment" for potentially making a minor oversight is still pretty frustrating. It's particularly annoying because there is a "Level Jump" function that lets you replay certain areas of certain stages, but it doesn't save any of the collectibles you get in this mode. How counterproductive.

There are a few technical issues too - mostly, the long load times. Bionic Commando is not always an easy game, especially when you're being pummeled through the air by BioMechs or targetted by half-a-dozen snipers at once. The checkpoints are reasonably placed, but every death requires an approximately twenty second reload, which can get really annoying in certain areas. Of the console versions, the PS3 version performs slightly better, with a smoother framerate and minimal tearing, while the PC version runs the smoothest on a decent rig, and mostly negates the loading time annoyance.

The last beef is with the plot, which is really... well, it's outright stupid. Bionic Commando appears to build up decent development with its cast, and it starts out good and keeps it going at a nice pace, despite not really going anywhere besides Spencer grudgingly following orders while he chews Joe out for losing his way. This eventually proves itself to be an illusion at the end of the game's second act, after the brutal Port Anderson level, where a straightforward terrorist-busting mission plunges into a portal of chaos and everything refuses to make sense afterward. The multitude of twists snaps the neck of the plot's plausibility.

It all begins with Spencer following Joe's instructions to move onward and eventually reach some sort of energy core known as the Carrion Device. Spencer then brings this MacGuffin to Joe, who reveals himself to be Silver, the terrorist leader, and he's captured Jayne to boot. The "you've been working for the bad guy all along" cliche is slightly annoying, but the fact that Joe is now evil without any single ounce of rationality or explanation for his face-to-heel turn is far worse. We don't even get an insane Kojima-esque exposition to explain it, he's just suddenly a bad guy and working with Groeder, who interrogated and tortured him in Bionic Commando Rearmed and also has no reason being his ally. It's easy to feel betrayed, especially since the name "Super Joe" has been around since the golden age of Capcom arcade games.

However, an awesome moment makes up for it where Spencer hijacks several helicopters in midair with his arm alone. Coming down from this part, Spencer and Jayne come across a man in white fatigues and a mask (who also showed up in an earlier cutscene where he sniped at Spencer and Jayne), claiming that he knows a lot about them and bionics. He then... disappears for the rest of the game, so we don't get to know what his deal is. Afterwards is the big fight against the spider-legged Constructor fortress and a bitching epic battle against Groeder, but when Spencer gets to Joe's secret base, it all goes goddamn haywire. Nathan tracks Joe down to an ominous control room where he is piloting a mechanical suit with the Carrion Device as its core. Images of his wife come back to him, and as he fights the remainder of BioReign troops, Joe's voice pipes up over the intercom, talking about how bionic parts are created. The flashbacks and Joe's banter all amount to a horrifying truth: BIONICS ARE PEOPLE. Their catalyst for function is the brain of a close friend or relative of their user; in Spencer's case, his wife. However, as rage-filled as Spencer is throughout the entire game, he seems to take this realization relatively well... or maybe he's so overcome with grief that he simply runs out of things to say.

Whatever the case, he views Joe at the center of the control room behind a window, and he keeps trying to break through it. Jayne then pops out of nowhere and rushes at Joe, only to be stopped by his mecha-power and stunned long enough for him to unceremoniously squish her to death. What could have been either a potential boss battle or the development of a comrade turns into a waste. Spencer barely seems to notice or care about this; he just keeps on slamming on the glass barrier until it bursts. As he runs towards Joe, "Project Vulture" comes to life as from the darkness of the surrounding arena comes a legion of what appear to be large flying humanoid robots. The "final battle" consists of Spencer tearing five of these Vultures apart via button-mashing (which is actually kind of cool and surprisingly challenging on higher levels) before he gets to Super Joe and prepares the final battle between man-machine and man-in-machine. However, you are sadly offered no battle here; Spencer kills Joe in a cutscene where he keeps headbutting until he breaks Joe's shield glass and the man's face, somehow causing Joe's mecha-suit to overload and explode, triggering termination in the dozens of Vulture suits in the sky who fall back down to Earth along with Spencer, who plummets into the dark ominous hole in the top of the NSA Archive building and... wait, what the hell?! Are those the credits?! Goddamit!

Here, the player is cheated out of a final boss and force-fed a cliffhanger ending, a rather honking double-whammy. The ire further rises when a juicy carrot dangles in front of your face with a post-credits message talking about the completion of Project Vulture as phase 1. An ominous Morse code response actually says to go ahead with phase 2: Project Albatross! This bad plot could have been mostly redeemed if a sequel would be released, explaining why Joe went maverick, what's the deal with the white-clad sniper, and what's the deal with the re-resurrection of Albatross. Maybe the writers had a few things planned that intended to link Mercs into the overall Bionic Commando canon; the sniper is actually revealed to be "Thomas Clarke" in the credits, the name of player three from Mercs, and let's not forget that Joe's full name, Joseph Gibson, was his billing as player one. Maybe the designers didn't know where they were going? Perhaps the last segments of the game were rushed and the bizarre twists are the result of time constraints? Or maybe they had a master plan that intended to make sense out of all this ribble-rabble?!

Sadly, Grin was shut down shortly after this project, partially due to the game's bad sales alongside a lack of profit from their movie-based titles Wanted: Weapons of Fate and Terminator: Salvation, as well the loss of a project from Square-Enix on a Final Fantasy spinoff. It's such a shame too, because Bionic Commando, while not perfect, is a fun game that deserves more credit than the sales charts attribute to it. More than anything, it yearns for a sequel which could improve on the first with better gun combat, more enemy variety and boss fights, and more exploration, all covered in a plausible plot that could answer the many questions left behind by this game's Gainax ending.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • GRIN AB

Publisher:

Director:

  • Ulf Andersson

Genre:

Themes:


Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)

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Bionic Commando (PlayStation 3)


Additional Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Bionic Commando (Arcade)
Bionic Commando (NES)

Page 2:
Bionic Commando (Game Boy)
Bionic Commando: Elite Forces

Page 3:
Bionic Commando Rearmed

Page 4:
Bionic Commando (2009)

Page 5:
Bionic Commando Rearmed 2

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