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Page 1:
Introduction
Prince of Persia (1989)

Page 2:
Prince of Persia (SNES)
Prince of Persia Classic
Screenshot Comparison

Page 3:
The Shadow & The Flame
The Shadow and The Flame

Page 4:
Arabian Nights
Harem Adventures
Special Edition

Page 5:
The Sands of Time

Page 6:
Warrior Within
The Two Thrones
Battles of Prince of Persia

Page 7:
Prince of Persia (2008)
The Fallen King

Page 8:
The Forgotten Sands (Consoles)

Page 9:
The Forgotten Sands (Portables)

Page 10:
The Graphic Novel
Before the Sandstorm
The Sands of Time (Movie)

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index


Prince of Persia - SNES, Wii (1992)

Super Famicom Cover

American SNES Cover

Except for the few extra levels on the European Mega Drive, the only significant differences between all versions of Prince of Persia are cosmetic. Not so the SNES version. It was published by NCS in Japan and Konami in the rest of the world, but the developer behind it was once again Arsys, who had already blessed three Japanese computer platforms with the Prince. Apparently the guys had enough of porting the same game over and over again and added all kinds of new content.

For starters, there is now a separate training mode that walks you through some basic traps and concepts step-by-step. There are no tutorial messages, but the first of five training stages doesn't even have any deadly fall. It gets gradually more dangerous, but things remain focused and easier than even the first normal level. Aside from a new entrance screen, the first level starts out exactly like it would on the Apple II, but before the Prince can get his hands on a sword, he needs to descent deep into the caves beneath the castle.

Most levels have small additions and variations like this. Then there's an entirely new area of the castle appended in front of the former stage four, and another one immediately after that. At the point where the Prince's shadow finally drops his fleshy counterpart down a pit, it doesn't just lead to just another dungeon like before, but a hellish magma cave where the air billows from the heat and many skeletons attack - it's almost as if this part was inspired by The Shadow & the Flame, if it wasn't actually released before Brøderbund's sequel. All in all, the entire map is roughly twice as large as it used to be, but to compensate Jaffar's hourglass now contains two hours worth of sand.

Wait, this wall wasn't open the last time I came here...

The new environments also bring new enemies: In the palace towers the Prince has to defend himself against amazon warriors and heavily armored royal guards, and deep within a temple with Egyptian and Hindu looking murals awaits a six-armed giant who jumps around the screen and makes it rain skulls. Jaffar's black magic was very understated in the first game - he summoned an hourglass of thin air and was presumably responsible for the attacking skeletons and the Prince's shadow, but that was the extent of his trickery. Now he is a powerful sorcerer who can levitate the Prince, only to smash violently to the ground.

Regular enemies, on the other hand, are a bit less mobile than they used to be. Formerly they would go after the Prince after pushing him down to the next lower level, but no they just keep standing there blocking the ledge, rendering the stage unwinnable if there is no other way around.

Additional traps also make the Prince's life more difficult. The heavy crushers that are first seen smashing a skeleton to dust work pretty much like the bladed doors, but conveyor belts (in ancient Persia?) can be a real nuisance during combat. Flames spring forth in regular intervals from cracks in the floor in the deep catacombs, and later on there are swinging beams that can only be passed by shoving along in a crouched position - a maneuver that seemed more like a glitch in previous versions but could be used to duck through closing gates in the last moment.

The supernatural is certainly more pronounced this time.

While the graphics cannot hope to be as detailed as the Macintosh version, Arsys' remake easily beats Brøderbund with the sheer power of variety. Instead of two meager alternating wall templates there is a new one after every two or three levels. It's still mostly castle walls, but Arsys did their best to include a few more vistas to the night sky, and there are added details like the mortal remains of former prisoners in the dungeon. The music is a bit quieter than the CD versions, but it fits the mood of the game splendidly.

Prince of Persia on the SNES is just bigger, better and better than any version before it. If you're going to a pick only one version of the game to play, it should really be this one.

Quick Info:

Developer:

  • Arsys

Publisher:

Genre:

Themes:


Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)


Additional Screenshots

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)

Prince of Persia (SNES)


Prince of Persia Classic - Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 (2008), Mobile (2009), iOS, Android (2012)

Xbox 360 Splash Image

In 2007, a remake of Prince of Persia was released on Xbox Live Arcade, soon followed with the PS3 port as Prince of Persia Classic. Although all of the graphics are 3D (and done in the style of The Sands of Time), the gameplay is still all 2D. The controls are fairly faithful, but in some cases have actually been tightened up to be more responsive. When trying to jump up to a ledge, the Prince now automatically turns around if necessary, and it's easier to turn around without immediately running in the opposite direction. This might actually throw off people used to the timing of the original versions, but it makes for generally much better control. The ability to jump and bounce off walls from the newer games has been included, but since the levels remain exactly the same there is not much use for it.

The one aspect that actually feels clumsier compared to the original is the combat. The early enemies are much too easily fooled by blocking and counterattacking so fighting them is devoid of any challenge, but later enemies become so apt at blocking themselves that combat turns into an endless exchange of blocks and parries. Especially the few giant enemies that are added in the mix are a major pain, and actually getting through their defenses feels completely random.

Prince of Persia Classic is very well animated. (Xbox 360)

Presumably to avoid putting off modern audiences, the game has been made much easier. The Prince is now guided by a magic sparkle that always shows the optimal way to the next target location, which can be switched off in the options. Enemies don't strike the Prince down before he gets a chance to draw his sword, anymore. Floor switches are now marked in bright colors - those that open doors are yellow, while those that close them are red. There are checkpoints in each stage that start the Prince with full health after dying, so health management is much less of an issue. There is still a timer counting down, but the game doesn't actually end when you run out of time - you just get a shorter ending after defeating Jaffar. For those who'd actually like to have a challenge, there is also a Time Trial mode available. Even harsher is the Survival mode, which demands to play through the entire game without dying.

Based on this version is also the mobile port by Gameloft. The characters and stages are converted into pre-rendered 2D graphics, much like the Donkey Kong Country series, and the controls have been reworked even more to make up for the typical issues that come when playing a game on a phone keypad, but there's another major issue, depending on the device it is played on: Most cell phones have a higher vertical resolution with a very narrow horizontal, which this game just wasn't made for.

In February 2012, Prince of Persia Classic arrived on iOs and later that year on Android, with dungeon maps and added FMV story cutscenes. The graphics are still only 2D, but look much better than on traditional mobile phones. The controls offer the choice between a virtual joystick, directional buttons and a slider. The latter two don't have a separate "up" direction, which sometimes makes it difficult to jump forward while standing below a ledge.

Jaffar has learned a few new tricks. (Android)

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Genre:

Themes:


Prince of Persia Classic (Xbox 360)

Prince of Persia Classic (Android)

Prince of Persia Classic (Android)

Prince of Persia Classic (Android)

Prince of Persia Classic (Android)

Prince of Persia Classic (Android)


Comparison Screenshots


Intro Screenshots


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Introduction
Prince of Persia (1989)

Page 2:
Prince of Persia (SNES)
Prince of Persia Classic
Screenshot Comparison

Page 3:
The Shadow & The Flame
The Shadow and The Flame

Page 4:
Arabian Nights
Harem Adventures
Special Edition

Page 5:
The Sands of Time

Page 6:
Warrior Within
The Two Thrones
Battles of Prince of Persia

Page 7:
Prince of Persia (2008)
The Fallen King

Page 8:
The Forgotten Sands (Consoles)

Page 9:
The Forgotten Sands (Portables)

Page 10:
The Graphic Novel
Before the Sandstorm
The Sands of Time (Movie)

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index