<div class=header> <div class=headerrow> <div class=headercell> <div class=headerlogo> <p class=image><a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/logo/hg101logo.png" alt="Logo by MP83"></a></p> </div> <div class=headerad> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- google_ad_client = "pub-5230184257141993"; /* HG101 */ google_ad_slot = "4961941287"; google_ad_width = 728; google_ad_height = 90; //--> </script> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/show_ads.js"> </script> </div> </div> </div> <div class=headerrow> <div class=headercell> <div class=headermenu> <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/alpha.htm" target="_parent">Articles</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/features.htm" target="_parent">Features</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/books.htm" target="_parent">Books</a> | <a href="http://blog.hardcoregaming101.net" target="_parent">Blog</a> | <a href="http://hg101.proboards.com/" target="_parent">Forums</a> | <a href="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/about.htm" target="_parent">About</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hardcore-Gaming-101/109837535712670" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/facebook.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/HG_101" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/twitter.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://ask.fm/hg_101" target="_blank"><img alt=" " src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/askfm.png"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.patreon.com/hg101" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/supportsmalla.png"></a> </div> <div class=searchbox> <form action="http://www.google.com/cse" id="cse-search-box" target="_parent"> <div> <input type="hidden" name="cx" value="partner-pub-5230184257141993:xfg3mydy24k"> <input type="hidden" name="ie" value="ISO-8859-1"> <input type="text" name="q" size="30"> <input type="submit" name="sa" value="Search"> </div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/coop/cse/brand?form=cse-search-box&amp;lang=en"></script> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Puyo Puyo

<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Introduction

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Tsū

Page 4:
Puyo Puyo SUN

Page 5:
Puyo Puyo~n

Page 6:
Nazo Puyo

Page 7:
Nazo Puyo (cont.)

Page 8:
Minna de Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2

Page 9:
Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary

Page 10:
Puyo Puyo BOX

Page 11:
Puyo Puyo 7
Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index


Puyo Puyo 7 (ぷよぷよ 7) - Nintendo DS, Wii, PSP (2009)

Cover (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 not only marks another change in the setting of the series, but also marks a change in how story-focused the series becomes. Whereas this would normally be a cause for concern with other games, Puyo Puyo 7 sets the tone for future releases by easily maintaining the lighthearted and humorous antics of the previous games with a few new main characters. Add to this its completely new mechanic, and Puyo Puyo 7 easily sets itself up as a highly entertaining addition to the series.

The game’s story mode is easily its biggest change. Whereas previous Sega-based games in the series give you the ability to play as a few characters and experience the story through their eyes, in this game you’re only given the option of playing as one character: a new girl named Ringo Andou. She isn’t the only new character, however; a few characters of the cast are new to accommodate for the change in setting.

New modes

Ringo Andou

The protagonist of the game, she's a regular schoolgirl until things take a turn for the not-so-regular. She plays the straight man to a lot of events that go on in the story, complete with overexaggarated portraits. Her name means apple, and many of her chain quotes focus on math terms.

Maguro Sasaki

Ringo's childhood friend, and the oldest son of a fishmongerer - in fact, his name means tuna. He carries around a kendama, which his chain animations focus on. A lot of his sentences end with a star for some reason.

Risukuma

A classmate of Ringo and Maguro. For some reason, he's obsessed with love - many of his chain quotes focus on such, as a matter of fact. Risu means squirrel and kuma means bear, so his name is a play on his appearance.

Ecolo

The antagonist of the game, it is a being that can travel space-time at will. It has a desire for fun, though its definition of fun is quite dangerous. It has the power of posession and imitation - as a matter of fact, it posesses Arle to set the events of the game in motion, and imitates others in its chain animations.

Whereas previous games in the series had you select courses of with a small number differing stages and different characters on top of that, since there’s only one main character here, things progress a bit differently. Instead of having selectable courses, story mode progresses through one continued story, divided into six acts with stages in each. Each stage has its own rule of battle for the match within, given to you before you select it. Much like Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary you’re given a rank after every stage, and the average of your rank is given after you clear each act (though this ranking is only shown in the options menu). Finally, although Ringo is initially the only character you’re allowed to play as initially through the story mode, you’re able to go back to certain stages and play as other characters once you’ve fully finished the mode. Unfortunately, you’re not able to play as absolutely everyone, and there’s not much incentive for doing this other than witnessing more of the charming dialogue the game has to offer. Still, it’s a small, yet nice touch to encourage replaying the story mode.

The plot this time around is a bit more detailed than the previous games. Ringo’s school begins to be flooded by puyo, and she must find a way to stop the endless assault of puyo from flooding her world. Along the way, she meets many characters from the previous titles - even a few Compile-era characters (Schezo, Rulue, Satan, Arle and Carbuncle, Draco, and Skeleton T) make their appearance once more as playable characters. Witch and Harpy even show up, though they are unfortunately only cameo appearances and not playable.

Puyo Puyo 7 doesn’t just bring a redesigned story mode to the table; it also brings a new mode, labeled Transformation mode. In this mode, your character is able to transform into either an adult or child version of themselves, a process achieved much like Fever mode. By offsetting, you fill up a gauge on the side of the screen, and by filling up all seven portions of it, you transform. Both adult and child form have their own differing mechanics; adult form is much like the Giant Puyo mode of Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary, in that you have a 3x6 field with larger than average puyo and only have to form three puyo together to make a chain. Child mode itself is also much like Fever mode, just smaller; with a 10x18 field and smaller puyo, your goal is to start the predetermined chains given to you in a correct manner. Both modes sport weaker chain power than normal, but this is because the magnitude of your chains carries over between transformation sessions. In child form, keeping your chain power is easy enough since it’s set exactly like Fever, but this is a bit more difficult for adult form since your chain magnitude can flat out disappear if you take too long between chains. This puts a bit more of an emphasis on transforming during a normal match, and something that stresses this is the fact that you’re also able to fill up the transformation gauge by clearing nuisance puyo on your side of the screen. This allows you to more freely dictate and plan out when you’d like to transform. Whether you transform into a child or an adult is dictated through a selectable option before the match starts - you’re also able to set it so that which mode you transform into is dependent on what color puyo you clear last, but this is more trouble than it’s worth since you have to juggle between two forms which splits your offensive power considerably. Finally, you’re able to instantly drop your puyo by pressing up, a first for the series.

As you’d imagine, these mechanics make the mode quite daunting. The magnitude of your chains as well as the extra time you can accumulate before entering said mode caps off at 99, so regular gameplay with friends can unfortunately seem like a race to see who can get more of a lead in their transformation states. What adds to this is that, unlike Fever, no nuisance puyo drop down upon you while you’re transformed, so there’s no hope of interrupting your opponent while they’re focusing on chains. Consequently, this mostly eliminates the chance for a comeback unless you transform as well due to how much power you get during it.

Aside from the story mode, the endless and multiplayer modes from the previous game are available in Puyo Puyo 7 - there are also endless modes of both adult and child modes, keeping in with the new feature. The lesson mode from Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary also makes a return appearance, though it’s been formatted a bit differently. Instead of showing you the three basic forms of chains like the previous lesson mode did, Puyo Puyo 7 opts for a bit of a more complete approach in regards to the fundamentals of the game. Not only are the rules of each game mode explained here in more detail, but you’re also taught the very basics of chaining before getting on to the type of chain patterns used in competitive play. There’s also a section that shows you how to fuse the stairs and sandwich pattern, which is a great move since visualization is key when working with new types of chains. A further step to ease new players in has also been taken through the practice questions given after every lesson. In Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary’s lesson mode, Ms. Accord and Popoi would offer slight quips here and there as you completed the practice - although they were entertaining, they didn’t help you focus much. In this game, however, things are much more helpful; you’re always given a tip that gives you a general idea of how to progress. What’s more, certain multi-step practice stages give you a new hint every time you drop your puyo down, which can help tremendously. Although the sets of 100 drills for each pattern are gone, Puyo Puyo 7 makes up for it through a tool that allows you to build your own board of puyo from scratch. Although this isn’t entirely new for the series - earlier games such as Super Nazo Puyo: Rulue no Roux had this, for example - there are a few new additions. The most important one is a password system, which finally allows you to share boards you’ve created with friends in a relatively simple manner. The other additions are mainly for curiosity’s sake: you’re able to adjust the board’s size to fit the dimensions of the adult and child transformations, able to change what character is behind the popping of the puyo to see their differences in power and voices, able to set the power and score of chains to Puyo Puyo Tsu’s or the later Sega games, and also able to change whether the mode is in fever or not. Finally, there’s an option to view up to four pre-made patterns of chains with a magnitude of up to 19, all different depending on what step you wish to view. Altogether, this makes for a very comprehensive tool to use for training, one that shouldn’t be overlooked if you want to get better.

Overall, Puyo Puyo 7 is a game that shouldn’t be passed up. Not only does it tell an interesting and humorous story, but the changes to the lesson mode make it so that both experienced and beginning players can get the most out of what the game has to offer. Although much isn’t made to change the core experience, and the main gimmick can be a bit overwhelming, it’s still a game that’s worth checking out.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Director:

  • Takumi Yoshinaga

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)

Puyo Puyo 7 (Wii)


Puyo Puyo! 20th Anniversary (ぷよぷよ!! Puyopuyo 20th Anniversary) - Nintendo DS, Nintendo 3DS, Wii, PSP (2011)

Cover (DS)

Another celebration of the series’ history, Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary offers an experience much like Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary. This isn’t to say it’s completely the same game, as there are a few new features and changes this time around - enough to make this game a much more fulfilling experience than its predecessor.

Just like Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary, the story mode here is the main attraction of the game. This time around, though, the main goal seems to be fixing the problems that the last story mode held. For example, a failing of Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary’s story mode was that every scenario seemed more or less the same: with all of them having about the same ending, there wasn’t really much of a motivation to complete everyone’s story. In this game, however, everyone’s scenarios are completely different. With things like changing sceneries within almost every story and different tones to each one, this story mode is easily much more of an engaging affair than its predecessor--especially with one final scenario to play through after you finish every character’s scenario. The other problem that the previous anniversary game had was the game mode selection after every round. With it being a roulette-styled affair, picking a game mode could be frustrating at times if you didn’t get the mode you wanted, especially if it led to your failure. Here, however, you’re always given six options to choose from at will. The first three of these options always vary: most of the time, an option will correspond with what setting the characters are in, another option will correspond with the opposing character, and the third option is seemingly random. No matter the top three choices, though, the fourth and fifth options are always modes of Puyo Puyo and Puyo Puyo Tsu, while the last is a roulette. Overall, this provides a much more fair experience; you’re not only allowed to choose what mode you’d like from the options provided, and even if you don’t like the modes the game offers, you’re always able to choose from two simple modes on top of that. It’s rare that you’ll dislike the modes that the game offers, however, as this game introduces a few new creative modes into the mix. Excavation mode also returns, though the size of the board now matches the new 10x18 field established in Puyo Puyo 7. Though the change is small, it makes for much more of a longer, fair bout.

New modes

Active

You can still place Puyo while a chain is taking place on your side of the field, which is a stark contrast from normal play where you're forced to wait. The fact that quick drop is enabled means that, if you're fast enough, you can quickly set up an extension to your chain as it's taking place. No unique dropsets, and since you can move as a chain is taking place, it's easiest to think of offsetting as a Fever style affair.

Blocks

A pattern of blocks (chosen randomly) are set upon both players' fields, forcing each player to think of how to best work with the situation they're given on the fly with their equal footing. Puyo Puyo Tsu rules of offsetting and dropsets apply.

Cross Spinner

Basically the same as Spinner from Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary, but instead of one whole spin, the field is split down the middle and both halves spin. Quick drop is also added.

Gust

After 10 seconds, a gust of wind blows your entire field in either a left or right direction for 10 more seconds. The only hint as to which direction it will be is how the windmill in the background spins; if it spins clockwise, the wind will go right, and the opposite for a counterclockwise spin. Unlike the Spinner modes, you don't gain a bonus to your chains for adapting to how this mode makes you think. Since how the wind pushes your puyo can also be a bit unpredictable, this mode can seem like a bit of a nuisance. Puyo Puyo Tsu rules of dropsets, Fever rules of ofsetting, with quick drop.

Quartet

Everyone's dropset consists of four puyo instead of the standard two. Although there are no character unique dropsets, all players' sets of puyo are completely random. Puyo Puyo Fever rules of offsetting.

Slot

After 30 puyo are cleared between each participant, a roulette in the middle of the screen begins to stop spinning and eventually chooses from a few effects. There are effects that are good which are granted to the player that pops the last few puyo that bring the counter to zero, effects that are bad which are granted to the player that doesn't, and effects that are granted to both players. Although the mode seems interesting on paper, these effects lend to the game being quite drawn out on average: an infamous effect is one that swaps both players' fields. Because of this, one player's work to fill the opponents' board can go completely and utterly wrong with little to no chance of counterplay. The strength of chains has unfortunately been reduced, which doesn't help the slow nature that the slot brings at all. Puyo Puyo Fever rules of offsetting, Tsu rules of dropsets.

Foursight

Instead of being able to see just the next two pairs of puyo, you can now see four, leading to more strategy in play when planning out chains. Puyo Puyo Tsu rules of dropsets and offsetting.

Mega Puyo Rush/Mini Puyo Fever

Although not new modes in themselves, it's worth noting that the main mode introduced in Puyo Puyo 7 doesn't make a return here. Instead, the adult and child modes have been taken to be standalone modes, much like Endless Fever from 15th Anniversary.

The core experience of lesson mode remains mostly unchanged from Puyo Puyo 7; there are still the same chain tutorials, as well as in-depth rule explanations for each mode. What is new, however, are two new sections inside of this lesson mode. The first is basically a mission mode, where you have as much time as you’d like to complete one task at a time with a rank given to you depending on how well you complete said tasks. Although it seems simple, the objectives themselves are quite difficult. One such objective asks you to perform at least a 7 chain that results in an all clear. Although this is possible given enough work, the next version of the objective tasks you with preforming at least a 5 chain that results in an all clear while a nuisance puyo constantly drops down at set intervals, forcing you to constantly rethink and adjust your strategy because of the random nature. All of the challenges ramp up in difficulty in a manner like this, and since you can only access a few after completing ones before them, it’s guaranteed you’ll be occupied for a while. The challenge doesn’t stop there; the other section tasks you with defeating a maximum difficulty AI in the rulesets from the original Puyo Puyo all the way to Puyo Puyo Fever, with mission mode added as well. Having the AI be set to its maximum difficulty is one thing, but there’s another challenge against you; the AI is able to drop their puyo instantly, while you’re not. This ensures that your opponent will always have their chains ready before you, which means you’ll have to play incredibly fast if you want any hope of winning. Due to the sheer difficulty of these two sections, they’re more geared towards advanced players. This is quite a good thing, as it ensures that both newcomers and experienced players get something out of the game’s lesson mode.

Finally, there’s a new mode introduced, one that isn’t shown within the story mode because it’s a strictly four player mode. The new mode - called Pair Puyo - is a very unique mode, as the main idea here is coordination. In a two-on-two battle, you and your ally work to defeat the other team with a few unique teamwork gimmicks in place. The first relates to timing: whenever someone on a team initiates a chain, the other person has a certain amount of time to follow up with a chain of their own. From that point on, a timer runs down for both of them, one that is only refreshed by more chains between the two of them. Each chain between the two counts as if it were part of a whole chain for nuisance puyo purposes, and increments a counter to let you know the strength of said chain. Since every chain during this time resets the timer between the team, it’s quite simple to make small single chains to reset the time so that the partner has more time to create a larger chain. Once the time runs out, the total strength of the chain is used to send even more nuisance puyo to the opposition, on top of the nuisance puyo already sent over because of the chains it took to get to that point. Because of this, the chains in this mode can easily get quite huge in a short span of time, making for a hectic, yet fun battle in pretty much every playthrough as you try to figure out when and how to start your chains. That’s not all, though; the second teamwork gimmick relies on coordination. If you and your teammate start a chain of the same size at the same time, the combined power of your chains will be increased dramatically. Both of these teamwork gimmicks together make for a very intense, unique style of playing Puyo with friends, and needless to say, it’s quite a blast and needs to be experienced at least once. Because of this, it’s highly recommended you try this mode out at least once, if nothing else.

Aside from these new modes, the last new offering of this game is a shop, something that was last seen in Puyo Puyo Fever 2. Much like that game, you receive points after every time you play Puyo, and are free to spend said points here. Unlike Puyo Puyo Fever 2, however, you don’t buy items to affect gameplay. Instead, you buy cosmetics, such as skins for puyo, or alternative voices and costumes for certain characters. There’s also a section that lets you buy advice, and if you do so enough, you can receive some of the modes from Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary, all with quick drop enabled.

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary doesn’t do much to shake up the formula, but on its own it’s quite the fun game to play through. The game is packed with new features and a bunch of addicting content, so if you decide to pick up the game, it’s pretty certain you’ll be playing over and over again for a long time.

Quick Info:

Developer:

Publisher:

Director:

  • Takumi Yoshinaga

Genre:

Themes:


Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)

Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary (3DS)


<<< Prior Page

Next Page >>>

Page 1:
Introduction

Page 2:
Puyo Puyo

Page 3:
Puyo Puyo Tsū

Page 4:
Puyo Puyo SUN

Page 5:
Puyo Puyo~n

Page 6:
Nazo Puyo

Page 7:
Nazo Puyo (cont.)

Page 8:
Minna de Puyo Puyo
Puyo Puyo Fever
Puyo Puyo Fever 2

Page 9:
Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary

Page 10:
Puyo Puyo BOX

Page 11:
Puyo Puyo 7
Puyo Puyo 20th Anniversary

Discuss on the Forums!

Back to the Index